Trump wins Republican caucuses in Nevada

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump speaks at a caucus night rally in Las Vegas, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2024. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

By Lorraine Longhi

February 9, 2024

Trump’s win was a foregone conclusion, after the state Republican Party set up its caucus as the only race that would count for the purposes of determining the party’s nominee for president. 

Former President Donald Trump clinched an expected and anticlimactic win in the Nevada Republican caucuses Thursday night, celebrating his victory at the Treasure Island Hotel and Casino.

The Associated Press called the race for Trump shortly after the caucuses concluded Thursday. As of Friday morning, Trump had secured 99% of the vote.

Trump’s win was a foregone conclusion, after the state Republican Party set up its caucus as the only race that would count for the purposes of awarding delegates to determine the party’s nominee for president. 

The move effectively rendered Tuesday’s primary election a pointless exercise with no tangible impact on the Republican race. Former South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, who did not participate in Thursday’s caucuses and opted not to campaign in Nevada as a result, has described the state’s election as “sealed up, bought and paid for.”

Haley lost Tuesday’s state-run Republican primary—where Trump’s name did not appear on the ballot—to “None of these candidates.”

“I’d like to congratulate ‘None of the above,’” Trump said at his caucus watch party following the caucuses.

The former president is on track to face off against President Joe Biden in November’s general election. 

Reach the reporter at [email protected].

  • Lorraine Longhi

    Lorraine Longhi is a reporter for The Nevadan and native of the southwest. A graduate of Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism & Mass Communication, she spent eight years reporting in Arizona, including at The Arizona Republic and The Copper Courier, where she covered education, health care and state politics. She returned to Las Vegas, her hometown, last year as an education reporter for the Las Vegas Review-Journal, where she was later promoted to assistant city editor

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